Pasivation

Passivation of

STAINLESS STEEL

Manufacturers of food and pharmaceutical processing equipment predominantly use stainless steel as their favored construction material. This is due to the material’s ability to maintain a high level of performance while keeping corrosion to a minimum.

Passivation is an extremely important surface treatment that helps to ensure the successful corrosion resistance performance of the stainless steel used for the product contact surface.

What is

PASSIVATION?

Stainless steel gets its corrosion resistance from a thin, durable inactive layer of chromium oxide that forms at the metal’s surface. This gives stainless steel its corrosion resistance quality. This inactive layer is achieved by passivation.

Passivation is the removal of exogenous iron, or iron components, from stainless steel surfaces. This is achieved through the chemical dissolution that will remove the surface contamination. This process will not significantly affect the stainless steel itself.

Why

PASSIVATE?

Cleaning and passivation of new stainless steel are imperative to draw out the full potential of the steel’s corrosion-resistant properties. On the other hand, the on-service stainless steel without passivation will greatly reduce the corrosion resistance of the alloy, falling short of its life expectancy.

INDUSTRIES WITH PASSIVATION NEEDS:

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Food and Beverage

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Chemicals Processing

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Aerospace Technology

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Pharmaceutical

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Medical Appliances

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Electronics

OTHER SERVICES OFFERED

Derouging

Stainless steel surfaces are passivated during installation. With time a reddish-brown rouge will appear over the steel’s surface. This is a product resulting from corrosion reaction in the system. Derouging is the chemical process of removal of the rouge of the metal oxides and hydroxides.

Descaling

Mineral scale deposits can plug pipes, which then reduces the system’s production. Operators and technicians are then forced into a relentless and costly struggle to optimize these systems. Descaling is the process in which these mineral deposits are removed from the system. Doing this restores your equipment to high-efficiency standards.

Degreasing

Your equipment may become exposed to grease, oil, fingerprints, protective coatings, or other organic contamination. This can occur during manufacturing, installation, or servicing of individual parts or systems. Degreasing removes this contamination with the use of alkaline or emulsifying detergent cleaners.